UNE Research

ABC New England North West recently visited us at the Museum to meet with Russell who shared with them a couple of his favourite specimens. ...

Looking at a primate specimen, such as this mounted specimen of a rhesus macaque, is a bit like looking into our human past, and perhaps a bit of the present too. ...

Look closely and you’ll notice a number of faint cuts and pits across the surface of this rib bone. This rib belongs to a Diprotodon, an extinct rhino-sized relative of today’s wombats that lived during the Pleistocene (0.1–2 million years ago)....

Xerochrysum sp. Glencoe was first collected by Alan Cunningham in 1827 and then again in 1957 by Max Gray. Only recently did we rediscover this stunning perennial herb. ...

The tusks have a variety of uses, although for the most part they are used in self defence, and by males when posturing to establish dominance hierarchies. However, if display alone is not effective, males will use their tusk to strike and injure their opponent....

Fingerprinting Gobi Dinosaurs is an exhibition of field images by Dr Phil Bell whilst on-site in Mongolia. This insight into UNE research opens in the Museum's Collaborative Learning space Sunday 23rd of July to coincide with the Vice Chancellor's Community Open Day....

The story of the loss and rediscovery of Notamacropus parma or Parma Wallaby is an interesting one. After the arrival of foxes and cats in New England, many mammals became threatened, and some were sent to extinction. ...

We keep the N.C.W. Beadle Herbarium cool and dry to protect the 100,000 pressed and dried herbarium specimens safe from harsh environmental conditions and from chewing insects. The oldest specimen belonging to our collection was collected in 1894 in Europe. The most recent collections incorporated...