WHAT’S ON

VC’s open day – Sunday July 23 10am – 3pm

The Discovery team will be hosting some FUN at the VC’s Open Day at the Natural History Museum on Sunday 23rd of July!

Come check out the amazing new labs, and get into some palaeontology; microscope work with pollinators, butterflies and ants; drawing skulls & specimens; curious chemicals; precision ag; bubble-ology and more!

We’re officially open – come and visit!

The Agricultural Education Building (our home) was officially opened on Monday 13th March by the Deputy Prime Minister Hon. Barnaby Joyce.

MASTER CLASSES

Our master class program is in development.

Look out for our future workshops on:

  • Taxidermy
  • Biological illustration
  • Still life with dead things
  • Insect pinning
  • Discovery Bus activities for kids, ages 5 – 12

RESEARCH CABINET

The research cabinet is designed to showcase the work of our scientists and share with the community their important research contributions, with the contents rotating on a regular basis. Currently on display is the telemetric equipment used by Professor Fritz Geiser the Torpor Lab and Behavioural and Physiological Ecology Research Centre to gather data in the field.

 

In the past, technology restricted detailed behavioural and functional studies on animals to within the laboratory. The major drawback of such studies is that animals often do not behave in captivity as they do in their natural environment. The development of small radio-transmitters have removed these limitations, and meaningful data can now be obtained remotely from free-ranging animals.
The focus of Professor Geiser’s study is to measure the body temperature fluctuations and energy expenditure of a Sugar Glider, Petaurus breviceps, after a bush fire event. Telemetry is a communication system that automatically transmits data from a remote device (in this case the radio-transmitter on the Sugar Glider) to the receiving equipment. The animal is first trapped, then weighed and measured before being released with the telemetric radio-transmitter attached. The device provides long-term data from the animal allowing scientists to simultaneously measure thermal biology, behaviour, activity patterns and the home range of animals in the wild.